What Is The Need For Encompass In The Modern Day Animal Rights Movement?

The professional farmed animal protection movement wants to be a global powerhouse capable of taking on and eliminating practices and industries that have existed for decades. It wants mainstream support—to no longer be seen as a radical, niche passion. In order to get to this place, we must examine the state of our organizations and the movement at large. Is it equitable? Is it conscious and inclusive? Can people all over the identity spectrum see themselves represented?

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Our Movement Can’t Be Effective Without Being Inclusive

Effectiveness has become a cornerstone principle of the professional vegan movement. By adopting this approach, we’ve achieved monumental successes for animals with our relatively modest resources. But there may be a downside to this calculus-driven method of ending animal cruelty. In striving to do good better and do the most good they can do, the mainstream farmed animal protection movement have often left racial diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts out of the effectiveness equation.

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Trust Women–And Trust People of Color, Too

I can’t help but follow every bit of the national dialogue unfolding around Harvey Weinstein and other abusers. But one thing I keep noticing is that these stories are coming largely from white women. Why is it so much easier for our society to believe white women who say that patriarchy exists than it is to believe people of color who say racism exists?

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“What are you?”: My Experiences with Racial Curiosity, Categorization, and “Othering”

As a biracial woman, I have been asked “what are you” more times in my life than I can count. Some evolutionary psychologists theorize that categorizing things in the world around us is part of our evolutionary psychology. Whatever the origins of this urge, we ought to be more conscious of it and how it seeps into our interactions with people of different races.

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Why People of Color and White Folks Think About Race Differently

In general, white people come to conversations about race as good individuals. People of color come from a place of collective racial identity. It is this positioning that allows us to walk past each other. This post examines six ways to look at and deepen our understanding of race, and how to help us figure out the shape of oppression.

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Why Was Encompass Founded?

Our strategic thinking and capability to quickly innovate have both been vital to our success. But something is missing. People of color make up 38% of the U.S. population, but less than 11 percent of staff and a mere 8 percent of leaders at the top 20 U.S. farmed animal protection organizations. We have an opportunity before us and Encompass plans to harness it.

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8 ways white folks can support people of color

This week we've seen an uptick in white folks asking what they can do to support people of color in the wake of Charlottesville, so we developed this short list. It's by no means exhaustive but it’s a start.

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One Person of Color’s Experience at the 2017 National Animal Rights Conference

The National Animal Rights Conference and the animal rights movement should be a safe space for everyone. Unfortunately, racism, tokenization, microaggressions and people of color being under-represented in the animal rights community is a problem that needs to be acknowledged and addressed. For us to succeed, the animal advocacy movement must be racially inclusive and that means we have a lot of work ahead of us.

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Celebrating the Globalization of Animal Advocacy—And Avoiding Imperialism

The influx of resources into countries with high-volume animal production and large populations of consumers--such as Brazil, Mexico, India, and China--allows us the opportunity to reduce the suffering of millions of animals who deserve protections like those we’ve enacted in the U.S. While the potential is great, this international outreach of U.S.-based groups also poses a risk.

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Interview with Miyoko Schinner of Miyoko’s Kitchen

The “Role Model Effect” shows that when people of color, women, or other under-supported groups are in leadership positions, it inspires others who look similar or who have had similar experiences to aspire to that same level. One of my personal role models is Miyoko Schinner, a strong and powerful woman of color who is the founder and CEO of one of my favorite vegan companies, Miyoko’s Kitchen.

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